How can you refute atmospheric lenses

Atmospheric optics for beginners

Sunsets, rainbows, polar lights, halos, glories and mirages - these and many other phenomena of atmospheric optics are turned into a natural laboratory for physical discoveries in Michael Vollmer's richly illustrated and clearly understandable book. Hobby astronomers and nature observers, students of the natural sciences and teachers receive with this book a comprehensive source of information on - often only superficial or misunderstood - optical natural phenomena. The explanations are supplemented by a large number of simple experiments that you can imitate. In the second edition that is now available, only errors have been corrected in order to make this standard work available again quickly.

Atmospheric optics phenomena can be observed almost everywhere almost every day - but they are often overlooked. The sky clearly shows what happens to the light when it hits drops of water, smoke or clouds. All of these different phenomena can be traced back to the interaction of light with the matter in the atmosphere. With the help of this book you will understand how, where there is actually nothing but more or less pure air, colorful pictures can suddenly appear in the sky.

The author

Michael Vollmer studied physics at the University of Heidelberg. As part of his doctorate and habilitation at the Physics Institute as well as a postdoc year in Berkeley, he dealt with free metal clusters and metal clusters adsorbed on surfaces. He then worked as a private lecturer at the University of Kassel before accepting a professorship for experimental physics in Brandenburg in 1994. His research topics include imaging processes and spectroscopy in the infrared range, phenomena of atmospheric optics and the didactic applications of modern methods of physics. In 2013 he was awarded the Robert-Wichard-Pohl Prize of the German Physical Society.

 

Keywords

Atmosphere Atmospheric Optics Lightning Refraction Fata Morgana Mirage Optics Physics Reflection Rain Rainbow Mirror Scattering Weather Cloud

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1. Department of Technology, Technical University of BrandenburgBrandenburgGermany

About the authors

Michael Vollmer studied physics at the University of Heidelberg. As part of his doctorate and habilitation at the Physics Institute as well as a postdoc year in Berkeley, he dealt with free metal clusters and metal clusters adsorbed on surfaces. He then worked as a private lecturer at the University of Kassel before accepting a professorship for experimental physics in Brandenburg in 1994. His research topics include imaging processes and spectroscopy in the infrared range, phenomena of atmospheric optics and the didactic applications of modern methods of physics. In 2013 he was awarded the Robert-Wichard-Pohl Prize of the German Physical Society.

Bibliographic information