What are the main arguments against Zionism

Right-wing extremism

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Benz

To person

Born in 1941, studied history, political science and art history. Since 1990 professor at the Technical University of Berlin and head of the Center for Research on Anti-Semitism. Chairman of the Society for Exile Research. Co-editor of the historical journal.

Information on political education - current

Whether in the pub or on the bus - right-wing extremist ideas are still in public. Here you will find arguments against right-wing extremist prejudice.

Preface

What to do if an older uncle at a family celebration once again emphasizes the "good" deeds of the Nazis, for example the construction of the motorway or the end of mass unemployment. When dealing with right-wing extremist ideas, one repeatedly encounters historically traditional prejudices, which have their starting point predominantly in the ideology of National Socialism and which can have an impact up to the present day. This booklet deals with the most common prejudices in detail and refutes them.

In alphabetical order, key words and conceptual contexts of right-wing extremist propaganda are taken up and subjected to a critical analysis. References to literature and the Internet are used to further deal with the respective topic.

When dealing with right-wing extremist ideas, one repeatedly encounters historically traditional prejudices, which have their starting point predominantly in the ideology of National Socialism and which can have an impact up to the present day.

In doing so, you are confronted with pseudo-scientific argumentation techniques that want to make use of the uncertainties and ignorance of a broad audience about historical relationships.

The intention of such argumentation patterns is often to gloss over the historical image of National Socialism. In addition, reservations against those who think differently, minorities and foreigners are to be stirred up and a fundamental rejection of the democratic state and its rules of the game is expressed.

This article takes up common catchphrases and contexts of right-wing extremist propaganda and subjects them to a critical analysis.

Work shy

People who are unemployed or receive social assistance through no fault of their own are often defamed as "work-shy" in the daily conversation. During the Nazi era, the accusation of work shyness served as part of the collective term "anti-social" to characterize certain members of the lower social classes (such as beggars, prostitutes, homeless people, drinkers, non-conformists, dropouts) who mostly did not pursue regular employment. It was used long before the National Socialist era to justify compulsory social welfare measures ("work house").

As early as 1933, the Nazi regime began persecuting "work-shy" and other "asocials" who were sent to concentration camps from 1937 and subjected to other coercive measures (such as sterilization) because, according to the "Racial Hygiene and Population Policy Research Center" in the Nazi Reich Health Office anti-social character traits should supposedly be inheritable. In 1938 there was a wave of arrests with admission to concentration camps ("Arbeitsscheu Reich" campaign), which hit well over 10,000 people. The classification of a person as "work shy" was arbitrary, it was often done through denunciation. The lack of rights of the individual, the abandonment of the individual to the arbitrariness of the authorities, which corresponds to the wishes of those who use this term, is expressed in the discrimination of "work-shy".

Literature:
  • Ayaß, Wolfgang: "Asocial" in National Socialism, Stuttgart 1995.